Why We Decided To Create A Separate Photography Brand by Cindy and Sharon

Cindy Brown is an Atlanta-based wedding photographer who combines the skills of a photojournalist, the honesty of a documentary photographer and the quirkiness of a street photographer to significant life events. She photographs weddings of all styles, but chose to create a separate photography business focused on same-sex wedding photography to increase her online presence, branding and client base. We’re pleased to partner with Cindy for her guest blog post on why she decided to create a separate photography brand.


Three years ago I attended a photography business presentation led by a husband and wife wedding photographer team who described themselves as “wedding photographers in love.” They discussed in great detail the way they had built their wedding photography business based on their love for each other. I knew of at least 20 other high-profile wedding photography couples also marketing themselves as head over heels in love, as a way to connect with their clients.

That would never work for me, I thought … but then a light went off in my head. I might not be able to build a business around the hetero-normative concept of love … after all, the love of my life was, as I am, a woman. However, my partner and I could take the heed over heals in love idea and run in different direction, as same-sex wedding photographers in love.

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Landscape Photography Tips by Monica Roy Photography

Monica Roy is a wedding and portrait photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She spends the majority of her time on weddings, but her skills expand further than just people. We’re pleased to partner with Monica for her guest blog post on landscape photography tips and best practices.


When I’m not shooting the wedding and portraits that are my bread and butter, I’m photographing my travels.  And because I’m a nature lover, a large part of that travel photography is comprised of capturing landscapes. Whether they are lush and tropical or remote and desolate, all landscapes present their own set of challenges.

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Finding Your Ideal Clients by Alison Yin Photography

Alison Yin Photography is an award-winning wedding photography studio based in Oakland, California. Their style is true photojournalism, meaning they won’t direct their clients or tell them what to do or where to look. This tactic results in beautiful photos depicting real moments. We’re pleased to partner with Alison for her guest blog post on how to find the ideal clients for your wedding photography business.


When people find out I’m a wedding photographer, their first response usually is, “Wow, I bet you see a ton of bridezillas!”  But the truth is, we don’t.  My love of documentary photography is rooted in that I love people.  There’s no way I would have lasted six years as a full-time wedding photographer had I been working with bridezillas or groomzillas.

So, who are your ideal clients?

We work with people who respect and appreciate what we do.  Yes, in part we’ve been lucky to have such great clients find us, but we’ve also worked really hard to conceptualize who our ideal clients are and then target them.  Genuinely liking your clients is key for being able to make good pictures because if they can’t connect with you, how will they feel comfortable enough to relax around you on their wedding day?

finding ideal photography clients

Think about your circle of friends and what qualities make them your friends.  Most likely, you all have a lot of common interests and values, which is why you get along so well together.  Typically, we are attracted to people who are similar to us, which means your ideal clients are also probably a lot like you.  It’s a good exercise to sit down and write out some qualities and interests that you enjoy which you can use as a base for starting to identify who your ideal clients are.

For example, I love being active and outside, I love dogs, and I love a good party.  How does that translate to finding qualities of my ideal client? From that short list of interests, I can glean the following: my ideal clients love to be outdoors and so a good portion if not all of their wedding will be outside, they’re not too concerned with having everything be “perfect” on their wedding day, their wedding priority is celebrating with family and friends.  Your goal in finding these qualities is not to create a checklist to qualify your clients, but rather to get a general sense of the type of people with whom you will enjoy working and who will in turn appreciate your work the most.

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5 Tips For Genuine Expressions by Kim J. Martin

Kim J. Martin is an award-winning wedding photographer based in Sacramento, California. She is inspired by couples who allow her to capture them as they really are: ridiculously in love. This inspiration is what drives her to capture authentic moments at each photo shoot. We’re excited to partner with Kim for this week’s guest blog post on how to capture genuine expressions.


My favorite thing about photographing couples is capturing their natural interaction and to have them look like themselves. I always knew I wanted to photograph people this way, but it took me years to really develop my style and figure out how to get what I wanted. There’s lots of things I think of while shooting, but these are my top 5 tips for getting genuine expressions during an engagement session, couple’s session, or wedding day portraits.

Personality Match

First things first, your clients should be people you would become friends with if you met any other way. The more you have in common, both in personality and interests, the easier it will be to get to know them and then be able to capture that in images. This isn’t to say you have to be besties with every single client, but having a good baseline of similarities will set the stage for awesome images. It will also make it easier to warm them up and get them comfortable in front of the camera if you understand their humor and have a good idea of things that would make them smile.

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So You Want To Be A Wedding Photographer by Teresa K Photography

Teresa Klostermann founded Teresa K Photography in 2008 after realizing her passion for photography and true love. She broke into the saturated wedding photography market with relative ease and has won multiple awards for her work. We’re pleased to partner with Teresa for this week’s guest blog post on how to become a wedding photographer.


You’ve had a digital camera for a while and you have a deep passion for photography. All your friends think your work is amazing and now you’re thinking about getting into wedding photography. Here is a list of items to consider before jumping into weddings. Please keep in mind this list is not all-inclusive, but it touches on all the major things you should consider before you take the journey of turning your passion into a profession.

Know Your Craft

I’m not saying you have to be the best photographer in the world in order to be a wedding photographer (that comes with time and experience). However, you should know the ins and outs of your camera before taking on someone’s big day. Do you know the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO? Can you shoot in low-light conditions, can you shoot action, and do you know how to adjust your settings for bright conditions? A wedding day can move very fast and there are no do-overs if you miss a shot because you didn’t know how to operate your camera in tricky conditions. Having the technical aspect of your job down pat is something you should have a handle on before you jump into the business.

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